Rereading My Childhood – A Year With the BSC #23: Grades

A Year With the BSC is an informal series wherein I explore the 1990’s CD-ROM video game The Baby-sitters Club Friendship Kit. The game is more of a personal organizer; it features with a calendar, an address book, a stationary kit, a flyer maker, and a personality profile. I’m focusing on the more interesting aspect of the game: the personalized letters and the journal entries. The full list of entries can be found at rereadingmychildhood.com.

With Thanksgiving gone, let’s check in on what the BSC did.

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Okay, how the hell did a toddler sit on a pie and everyone just let him? You’re not telling us the whole story here, Jessi. I wonder if the story makes them look bad. You know. A whole house filled with baby-sitters allowing a baby to do something he’s not supposed to. Maybe it makes them look like they’re, at best, inattentive, or, at worst, negligent. You’re hiding something, Jessi, and Bob Woodward and I are going to find out what it is.

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We had our first snowfall in Reno and I wanted to go to southern California. I’m with you, Dawn.

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Claudia needs to stop comparing herself to her sister. And maybe she should spend less time on art. Now hear me out, stop throwing things. You can’t get into a good art school if you can’t get past middle school. I don’t want to grade shame you, but it does seem like a fixable problem. You at least got a 60 if you got a D, so there is some room to improve. Just saying. And if you don’t stop throwing paint on me, you won’t have enough to paint a life-size replica of the BSC, or whatever you do. I’m not a painter, I don’t know what to do with paint.

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Cool story, Kristy, but I think they would stop him from “coming up and swinging” if he didn’t have many home runs. The moral of the story should be that you should make up for your shortcoming by being better in something else. Claudia doesn’t have that problem. Her problem is that she keeps comparing herself to her sister and criticizing Janine when all Janine wants to do is help her. (See: Claudia and Mean Janine. I’ll get around to writing it someday.)

Rereading My Childhood – A Year With the BSC #21: What Backspace?

A Year With the BSC is an informal series wherein I explore the 1990’s CD-ROM video game The Baby-sitters Club Friendship Kit. The game is more of a personal organizer; it features with a calendar, an address book, a stationary kit, a flyer maker, and a personality profile. I’m focusing on the more interesting aspect of the game: the personalized letters and the journal entries. The full list of entries can be found at rereadingmychildhood.com.

It’s a short one this week, and I’m thankful for that, so let’s just jump right in.087.JPG

Abby must be vying to take over Vice-President if Claudia neglects her duties. What shameless sucking up, Abby! And just volunteering Claudia for the job? If she says no, she looks like a dick, and if she takes on this responsibility, then she won’t have time for her other responsibilities. Like, um, having a telephone. Look, Vice-President is a really more of an honorary title than an actual position.

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Okay, VP, there’s a backspace key. Why didn’t you just use the backspace? Also, how do you spell “animal” correctly the first time and not the subsequent times? I just don’t know about you, Claude. I’m worried. We’re all worried.

Rereading My Childhood – A Year With the BSC #19: Laughing All the Way to the ICU

A Year With the BSC is an informal series wherein I explore the 1990’s CD-ROM video game The Baby-sitters Club Friendship Kit. The game is more of a personal organizer; it features with a calendar, an address book, a stationary kit, a flyer maker, and a personality profile. I’m focusing on the more interesting aspect of the game: the personalized letters and the journal entries. The full list of entries can be found at rereadingmychildhood.com.

It’s a busy week for me, personally, with finals coming up soon and essays due, so I am happy to report it was a slow week for the BSC.

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I need to know what the set-up is for the punchline, “You’re just my type – – RH Positive.” A cursory Google search told me that to be RH positive means that you have the Rhesus factor, which would affect the birth of a baby if the mother is RH negative while carrying a fetus that is RH positive. Possible birth complication is just a gold mine of great comedy material.

Also, didn’t Logan already express interest in performing? Why was it a surprise when he performed?

Lastly, oh good, a white girl performing something called “The Mummy Wrap.” I’m sure it wasn’t as white as it sounds. Just kidding. It was whiter than I anticipated. She used Miracle Whip on a cheese sandwich while wearing New Balance shoes and wondering when Beyonce “got so political. Why can’t she just make fun music for the girls and me to listen to during book club? Why does she always have to use her massive, influential platform to talk about issues that directly affect her community?”

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I still think you guys should have just done a Haunted House like any good Halloweenies.

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There’s like ten people in town, of course Cokie Mason heard about your comedy club.

Rereading My Childhood – A Year With the BSC #16: The Costume Conundrum

A Year With the BSC is an informal series wherein I explore the 1990’s CD-ROM video game The Baby-sitters Club Friendship Kit. The game is more of a personal organizer; it features with a calendar, an address book, a stationary kit, a flyer maker, and a personality profile. I’m focusing on the more interesting aspect of the game: the personalized letters and the journal entries. The full list of entries can be found at rereadingmychildhood.com.

This week started with a letter from Mallory, who is always writing to me.

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The game asked me what my favorite game was and I said Final Fantasy VIII, which it is, don’t @ me with your undeserved love of VII. I don’t know how she won a 40-hour fantasy epic that is about true love in the face of witches, corrupt schools, and time travel, but okay. You won, Mallory. Sure.

Most of the BSC is still dealing with the “Hannie problem.”

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Maybe Hannie doesn’t want to celebrate Halloween. It’s her choice. Halloween is my favorite holiday, but I’m not going to make someone celebrate it. Unlike Abby, my love for Halloween doesn’t come from costumes. It comes from the one time of year people live the way I want to live all year around. There are haunted houses, horror movies, and cool decorations you can buy at Target and pop-up stores. I wish I could live like that all year around – haunted houses, horror movies every weekend, and buying skull decorations in July. (Okay, to be fair, I watch a horror movie (or horror TV show, what’s up, The Haunting of Hill House!) about once a week – even in May.)

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Why should Mrs. Papadakis buy a costume that her kid is only going to wear once? I understand that it’s a complete waste of money and resources.

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And just like that, once again, Mary Anne proves she’s the best babysitter. That’s an elegant solution to a non-problem.

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And just like that, once again, Claudia contributes so much to the conversation.

Rereading My Childhood: A Year With the BSC #15: Let Women Live, Dammit!

It’s been a few weeks. The computer I use to run the software was out of commission. Is the BSC the same? Do they still have their funny ways? Is Mary Anne still a crybaby? Or has she grown up a little? What about Kristy? How is our favorite president? And Claudia! Has she grown a little? Decided to buckle down and study? Has she worked on her spelling?

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Of course she hasn’t. And Abby is there to don her “Abbysplaining” cap.

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That’s not helpful, Abby. You just look like a jerk.

Meanwhile, Jessi has some legitimate concerns about the test.

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Not really, since I’m past the standardized testing phase of my life. I did worry about passing my math class a few semesters ago. If you didn’t get at least a C on the final, you couldn’t pass, even if you had 100% in the class up until that point. My school is serious about math, I guess.

Kristy also did a thing.

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Oh, Kristy, you did what every woman has done: laughed at a dumb boy’s joke so you don’t make him feel bad. Welcome to womanhood, where if you don’t laugh at a man’s joke, he’ll take it as an attack. This wasn’t a good few weeks for women. (Remember to vote!)

The BSC has a new problem! This time, it’s Suzi Barrett.

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You know what? You shouldn’t do anything. Let the girl live, dammit. She’s only got a few more years of blissful ignorance, let her wallow in it. And while I’m at it, would everyone just let woman live? Like, in general? Just let us hang out with our friends and drink in peace. Stop it with the death threats. And the assaulting. Especially the assaulting. Just let women live, dammit.

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Yeah, but we all have to grow up someday. Whether it’s when you buy your first bra or the first gross dude shouts at you on the street, we all have to grow up.

Until then, let Suzi wear her Halloween costume. Hannie Papadakis can say she’s too grown up for Halloween, and that’s okay. Let her pretend to be too grown up for the best holiday of the year. (It’s true, don’t @ me.) Let the BSC worry about standardized testing. I do think Claudia should improve her spelling, though. That just seems useful. It’s very useful when you want to read a voting ballot.

Rereading My Childhood – A Year With the BSC #12: Send In the Grandparents!

A Year With the BSC is an informal series wherein I explore the 1990’s CD-ROM video game The Baby-sitters Club Friendship Kit. The game is more of a personal organizer; it features with a calendar, an address book, a stationary kit, a flyer maker, and a personality profile. I’m focusing on the more interesting aspect of the game: the personalized letters and the journal entries. The full list of entries can be found at rereadingmychildhood.com.

Consider the last episode of A Year With the BSC a cliffhanger!

When last we saw our babysitters, Abby was wondering when Grandparents’ Day is, and now we have our answer! Take it away, Kristy!

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Umm, that still didn’t really explain what Grandparents’ Day is. Maybe it’s a Connecticut thing. Hey, Connecticut, tell me if this is a thing there, would ya?

Also, I can’t believe that Kristy wrote in all-cursive-caps. It’s like she’s shouting at me. “Hey, little Amy, are you taking your grandparents to BRING YOUR GRANDPARENTS TO SCHOOL FOR SHOW AND TELL DAY, ya’ bitch!” “I was but now I’m scared you’ll give my grandmother a heart attack.”

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Yeah, Kristy, why didn’t you think about those of us who’ve lost our grandparents? I have never met my grandfathers but both of my grandmothers were involved in my life.

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Why did Stacey write this and not Kristy? Anyway, I guess it’s better than nothing. What about those kids who have no parents or grandparents, huh? They just go to school by day, work in an 18th-century factory by night, and have no relatives? What about those kids?

Jessi is here to change the subject.

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Man, a lot of parades in Stoneybrook. Every other book features a parade. And now more parades in The Baby-sitters Club Friendship Kit. No joke. I haven’t seen a parade in, like, two decades. I think I was thirteen the last time I saw a parade. Also, it’s ironic that Claudia and the BSC did so much to get Sean Addison to appreciate his tuba, only to render it useless while he’s getting rained on.

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Yeah, Mary Anne, I read all about Kristy’s BRING YOUR GRANDPARENTS TO SCHOOL FOR SHOW AND TELL DAY. While children in other countries are learning second languages, geology, and painting, we’re listening to Grandma Ebby’s day at the fair.

Rereading My Childhood – The Baby-Sitters Club #2: Claudia and the Phantom Phone Calls

Previously On Rereading My Childhood – The Baby-Sitters Club #1: Kristy’s Great Idea

At one time, I was just collecting and reading The Baby-Sitters Club. I was going to Goodwill every two weeks, buying whichever books in the series I was missing. Then I’d go home and read one every once in a while. Sometime during Claudia and Mean Janine, I got the idea to review these as writing practice and maybe help me build a portfolio. That’s why the first one is Boy-Crazy Stacey.

After I wrote a few of those I went back to the beginning – for continuity’s sake. I can’t review two hundred BSC books and skip over the first seven for no discernable reason. I went back through Kristy’s Great Idea and wrote what became one of my favorite reviews. Then I came to this book and put it off. When it showed up again in the rotation, I did a different book.

Eventually, I had to take a deep breath and jump back into Claudia and the Phantom Phone Calls, much to my chagrin. I hate this book. There. Plain and simple. It has a terrible message, and terrible people get rewarded for doing terrible things. It’s a terrible ball of terrible, but I read it. For continuity. So welcome, to the nightmare that is Claudia and the Phantom Phone Calls.

SPOILERS AFTER THE COVER!!!

The Baby-Sitters Club #2: Claudia and the Phantom Phone Calls
Hello? The worst BSC book? It’s right here, let me give it the phone.

It starts out like all the other books that center around Claudia – she is struggling with school and comparing herself to her genius sister.

The thing about homework is that it is just so boring I can barely concentrate on it. And it’s useless. Who cares whether > means greater than or less than, or what X equals?

I don’t know, Claudia, anyone who wants to solve almost any practical problem ever? If one of your dumb baby-sitting charges is supposed to have twelve blocks in his toy chest, but he only has five, how many blocks has he eaten? That’s what X equals.

If Claudia didn’t spend so much time thinking about how schoolwork is boring, she could probably just learn the material and move on. Or she has a learning disability, and then it’s the school that is failing her. However, I haven’t read anything that indicates a learning disability, just laziness on Claude’s part.

But this isn’t Rereading My Childhood While I Complain About Claudia Kishi, Don’t @ Me, Mary Anne is the Best and Everyone Should Know That. I have to move on.

Then, like every book, Ann M. Martin feels the need to tell me that Claudia is Japanese and her grandmother, Mimi, has an accent, but her parents don’t. Does the accent come up later? No, but it seems to be Mimi’s only defining trait. Claudia starts to paint her and asks the very open-ended question, “Tell me about when you were a little girl in Japan.” Just, like, anything, Claudia? Is Mimi like Mary Lou Henner? “When I was eight, on December 3rd, I ate miso soup and a biscuit for breakfast. Then I bathed for 24 minutes.”

Then she goes into her clothes for the day, and they are, as usual, interesting.

I like bright colors and big patterns and funny touches, such as earring made from feathers. Maybe this is because I’m an artist. I don’t know. Today, for instance, I’m wearing purple pants that stop just below my knees and are held up with suspenders, white tights with clocks on them, a purple-plaid shirt with a matching hat, my high-top sneakers, and lobster earrings. Clothes like these are my trademark.

My sister is an artist but she wouldn’t wear capris with garish tights underneath. You are just silly. Also, I don’t think a “funny touch” is a feather. That sounds more like cultural appropriation to me.

Later, Stacey calls Claudia and our resident artist talks about her crush on Trevor Sandbourne – a boy who writes poetry for the school’s literary magazine The Literary Voice. Did you know that Robert Pinsky first published “Impossible to Tell” in Stoneybrook Middle School’s The Literary Voice? Poet Trevor’s peers are an august retinue.

Chapter two starts with a problem.

Stacey, Kristy, Mary Anne, and I did get together on Saturday, but we couldn’t think of a thing for the four of us to do together. Mary Anne wasn’t allowed to ride her bike to the mall. Stacey couldn’t eat s’mores or ice cream or anything fun. (She has diabetes and has to control very carefully the amount of sugar she takes in each day.) And there was only one movie playing in town and Kristy and I had already seen it.

Okay, a few problems here. Even if Mary Anne could ride her bike to the mall, what would you do there? Just sit around like you’re doing now. Secondly, just because Stacey is diabetic doesn’t mean she can’t be around sugar. Sugar isn’t airborne. I understand that you don’t want her to feel left out, but you guys can have a camp out that just happens to have s’mores, and, for example, roasted hot dogs or something. Lastly, Stoneybrook’s movie theater only shows one movie, but their middle school has a literary magazine. Sparks, Nevada has several movie theaters that show several movies and my school didn’t even have a newspaper.

So the girls talk about random stuff instead and mention Alan Gray, a boy who has been terrorizing Kristy since she was a child. Then the conversation turns to the plot point that the “Phantom Caller” is still on the loose.

[Mary Anne] took the paper and read: “‘Phantom Caller on Rampage in Mercer.'” She cleared her throat and glaced at us. Then she began to read again. “‘The thief, whom police have nicknamed the Phantom Caller, struck again in Mercer on Tuesday night. Following the pattern of his previous burglaries, he began making phone calls, this time to the home of Thornton and Sophia Granville of 236 Witmer Court, shortly after four P.M. He never spoke, simply hanging up the phone when someone answered. The Granvilles left their home at seven-thirty to attend a meeting of the school board. When they returned at ten-fiftenn, they found all of Mrs. Granville’s jewelry missing. Nothing else had been taken, despite the fact that a considerable amount of silver, as well as Thornton Granville’s famous and very valuable coin collection were in the house.

“‘This is the sixth home that Phantom Caller has robbed in the past two weeks, and the second home in Mercery. The first four robberties occurred in New Hope.'” Mary Anne stopped reading.

Cool, Newspaper Person. Got any more information about the Granvilles’ belongings? Emergency money in a fake book on the tallest shelf in the den?

The kicker is that while Claudia was babysitting for the Marshalls, the phone rang twice and when Claudia answered it, there was silence on the other end. Stacey comes up with the idea of a code for over the phone. If they are in trouble, they call another member of BSC and ask, “Have you found my red ribbon?” I don’t know why 911 isn’t the best option, but there’s a whole code they work out. It never really pans out, as the BSC can’t remember the code later in the book. They also decide to bring the BSC record book to school every day and look over it so they know who is babysitting for whom, which proves to be a huge security issue later.

At school, Claudia stalks Trevor Sandbourne outside The Literary Voice office, Alan Gray harrases her, and she attempts to find Stacey in the lunch room, but Stacey is standing in line next to Alexander Kurtzman, “who carries a briefcase and wears a jacket and tie, and lives to obey rules.” How this kid hasn’t been murdered is beyond explanation. Claudia spends her time expressing her desire to attend the school’s Halloween Hop with Trevor.

Claudia babysits for the Newtons and someone calls but doesn’t say anything when Claudia answers. A news report says the Phantom Caller was spotted in a stolen car, but it turns out the news reported that fact too hastily (how irresponsible, this is we get crazy alt-right jerks yelling about fake news) and the Phantom Caller is still on the loose. On a different night, Claudia babysits Eleanor and Nina Marshall and she gets another phone call with no answer. She calls Stacey to help her feel better, and they chat for a while, but it doesn’t help – Claudia is still freaked out. This is harassment, plain and simple, and I emphasize this so when the perpetrator is revealed and actually rewarded, you will understand my ire.

The first handwriting chapter is Kristy at Watson’s, babysitting Karen and Andrew. Karen expresses concern over their next door neighbor actually being a witch named Morbidda Destiny. The phone rings and Kristy answers it and there is no one on the other end. Then the phone rings again.

Ring . . . Ring.

At last Kristy reached for it. She knew she had to answer it. The caller could be Watson or her mother. She picked up the receiver and held it to her ear. But she couldn’t get any words out.

“Kristy?” as the caller.

“Claudia?” she whispered back. (The caller was me!)

Ladies and gentlemen, I present the limitations on the first-person perspective because that was silly. Kristy is so scared she doesn’t want to answer the phone, so the person harassing her is also a monster. He’s actually worse, but we’ll get to that.

Stacey has the next handwriting chapter at the Johanssens. It’s mostly uneventful. There is a thunderstorm, but that’s it. Mary Anne babysits David Michael, Kristy’s little brother, and she sets up a whole set of traps straight from the Kevin McCallister School for Home Defense. This ends up comedic and enjoyable.

Then Claudia’s next door neighbors are robbed, bringing the Phantom Caller threat straight to the BSC’s front door. This prompts Mr. Spier to forbid his daughter from babysitting until the Phantom Caller is caught. That’s a little reactionary, Mr. Spier. The Phantom Caller doesn’t rob homes that had people inside, he doesn’t murder anyone, and just because there’s some crime doesn’t mean you should lock Mary Anne away like you’re in a Bonte novel. They didn’t catch the Golden State Killer for decades and people were still able to babysit – didn’t see you locking Mary Anne behind three feet of bulletproof glass. Mr. Spier is a crazy man.

We are now at our climax. Kristy and Claudia dual babysit for Jamie Newton and his cousin, one of whom hates girls, including girl babysitters. He is a future politician.

The same things happen. Phone calls, no answer. However, this time, Kristy sees someone skulking outside the house. Claudia decides to call the police. The police arrive and catch the person skulker. (The skulked? The skulkee? Asshole. We’ll just go with Asshole.)

It’s fucking Alan Gray. And then we get this bullshit.

Son,” said Officer Stanton in a more kindly voice, “what did you want to ask her?”

Alan mummbled something that nobody understood.

“What, Alan?” asked Kristy, sounding nearly civil.

“I wanted to know if you’d go to the Halloween Hop with me.”

If I were Kristy, my eyeballs would have fallen out of my head along about then. But Kristy just said, “Oh, gosh, is that all? Of course I’ll go with you . . . Thanks.”

Lemme get this straight, Kristy. This boy, who makes fun of you, steals your homework as well as your lunch, and treats your friends like shit; stalks the house of the children you’re supposed to be watching over; scares the shit out of you so much so that you call the police; then the police have to chase him down in the rhododendrons, only to have him ask you out and you actually say, “Sure and thanks.” Are you fucking kidding me? What kind of message is that to young girls? If he scares you, it’s okay, he likes you. You know how someone is worth your time? They don’t fucking scare you! That’s how you know. Alan Gray should be arrested. Moreover, you know he’s definitely white because if he were black, he would have been shot on the spot. What sexist, patriarchal, white nonsense is this?

And you know who keeps calling Claudia and hanging up? Trevor Sandbourne. He’s trying to ask Claudia out. While not as egregious as Alan Gray stalking, Trevor’s behavior is still bad, but all Claudia can focus on is the Halloween Hop. Kristy is stalked but all she can focus on is that a boy likes her. She doesn’t even get angry that Alan Gray has been stealing the BSC record book to find where all the babysitters are on any given night and sharing that information with people (Trevor). This is a flagrant privacy violation.

There is some resolution to the relationship between Claudia and Janine, but it’s pointless, especially after the infuriating conclusion of this book.

This book should be banished to the edges of young adult literature and purged from every BSC collection. It has the worst message for young, impressionable girl readers: if a boy is mean to you, scares you, and doesn’t respect your privacy, he likes you and you should reward him by going to a dance with him.

Fuck this book. It’s easily the worst one. I’d prefer the babysitters being stalked by the actual Phantom Caller.

Speaking of whom, The Phantom Caller gets caught, and Mary Anne is allowed to babysit again, but more on the patriarchal nature of Mr. Spier later. My blood pressure is high enough as it is.

Next Time On Rereading My Childhood – The Baby-Sitters Club #8: Boy-Crazy Stacey

Rereading My Childhood – A Year With the BSC #8: A Simple Fix

A Year With the BSC is an informal series wherein I explore the 1990’s CD-ROM video game The Baby-sitters Club Friendship Kit. The game is more of a personal organizer; it features with a calendar, an address book, a stationary kit, a flyer maker, and a personality profile. I’m focusing on the more interesting aspect of the game: the personalized letters and the journal entries. The full list of entries can be found at rereadingmychildhood.com.

I got a letter from Jessi this week!

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The form asked what my nickname was and I assumed it was for logging in purposes. I don’t really have a nickname. My mother calls me “Kido” and my Filipino nieces and nephews call me “Tita Kido.” Literally everyone else in the world calls me “Amy.” Maybe Jessi is being sarcastic. “That’s a good one in that it’s not a nickname at all.” Jessi isn’t normally sarcastic, but maybe she wants to haze the newest member of the BSC.

Meanwhile, Claudia solved Shawn Addison’s tuba issue (tubissue).

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Really? That’s it? You just had to paint some stuff on his tuba? What about his parents? Like, musical instruments are expensive. I don’t know if they’d appreciate their very expensive investment becoming the art project of a preteen.

Maybe I’m the wrong one because it’s a hit with Jessi.

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By the way, A Year With the BSC is moving to Thursdays so I can write these on Wednesdays. Thanks!

Rereading My Childhood – A Year With the BSC #6: BSC Day Camp

A Year With the BSC is an informal series wherein I explore the 1990’s CD-ROM video game The Baby-sitters Club Friendship Kit. The game is more of a personal organizer; it features with a calendar, an address book, a stationary kit, a flyer maker, and a personality profile. I’m focusing on the more interesting aspect of the game: the personalized letters and the journal entries. The full list of entries can be found at rereadingmychildhood.com.

It must be Camp Week in Stoneybrook because that was the topic du jour this week. But first, a little story from Mary Anne.

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What if a movie doesn’t have a sad part? She’d probably find something the cry about. She feels things. Keep those feelings, Mary Anne. I was a sensitive kid, also. I was so sensitive that the other kids made fun of me. One day, I decided the way to get them to stop making fun of me was to stop being so sensitive. The kids found something else about me to tease and now I don’t feel anything besides anger.

Anyway, Mallory is excited for the annual Pike family trip to Sea City.

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I said it once during my review of Boy-Crazy Stacey and I’ll say it again, Mr. Pike must be in the mob. How can he afford an annual trip to Sea City complete with beach house for him, his wife, his seven children, and 24-hour babysitting fees? Unless Stoneybrook is the center of the east coast tech boom akin to Cupertino, the only way to explain his income is illegal activity. I also wonder if Stoneybrook has enough crime to support a thriving mafia underground. His quiet life in Stoneybrook must be a cover for his true job in Providence, Rhode Island. That’s it. That’s why they need so much babysitting – the commute must be a bitch.

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This entry is clearly referencing a BSC book I haven’t reread yet. I’ll be sure to mention that when I get to the book. I’m surprised they haven’t mentioned the kids’ day camp the BSC started in Kristy’s Big Day. Or the day camp they start in Mary Anne and Camp BSC. Or the day camp they start in The Baby-Sitters Club: The Movie.

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Oh, Claudia. I’m happy you tried.

Rereading My Childhood – A Year with the BSC #2: Stay Out of It, Dawn

A Year With the BSC is an informal series wherein I explore the 1990’s CD-ROM video game The Baby-sitters Club Friendship Kit. The game is more of a personal organizer; it features with a calendar, an address book, a stationary kit, a flyer maker, and a personality profile. I’m focusing on the more interesting aspect of the game: the personalized letters and the journal entries. The full list of entries can be found at rereadingmychildhood.com.

One of the things that the game asked me was the name of my favorite candy. If I had known they were going to ridicule me via letter, then I wouldn’t have told them.

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Hey, hey, Dawn? No one wants to eat that. Why would I want to eat something like that? Does that sound good to anyone on the planet?

Also, Claudia babysat for a pair of children, and for a second, I thought they couldn’t spell their own children’s names.

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For the record, those names are pronounced “Shawn” and “Corey.” Unless Claudia spelled their names correctly and their parents are the ones who can’t spell.