Rereading My Childhood – A Year With the BSC #8: A Simple Fix

A Year With the BSC is an informal series wherein I explore the 1990’s CD-ROM video game The Baby-sitters Club Friendship Kit. The game is more of a personal organizer; it features with a calendar, an address book, a stationary kit, a flyer maker, and a personality profile. I’m focusing on the more interesting aspect of the game: the personalized letters and the journal entries. The full list of entries can be found at rereadingmychildhood.com.

I got a letter from Jessi this week!

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The form asked what my nickname was and I assumed it was for logging in purposes. I don’t really have a nickname. My mother calls me “Kido” and my Filipino nieces and nephews call me “Tita Kido.” Literally everyone else in the world calls me “Amy.” Maybe Jessi is being sarcastic. “That’s a good one in that it’s not a nickname at all.” Jessi isn’t normally sarcastic, but maybe she wants to haze the newest member of the BSC.

Meanwhile, Claudia solved Shawn Addison’s tuba issue (tubissue).

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Really? That’s it? You just had to paint some stuff on his tuba? What about his parents? Like, musical instruments are expensive. I don’t know if they’d appreciate their very expensive investment becoming the art project of a preteen.

Maybe I’m the wrong one because it’s a hit with Jessi.

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By the way, A Year With the BSC is moving to Thursdays so I can write these on Wednesdays. Thanks!

Rereading My Childhood – A Year With the BSC #5: Good Job, Mallory

A Year With the BSC is an informal series wherein I explore the 1990’s CD-ROM video game The Baby-sitters Club Friendship Kit. The game is more of a personal organizer; it features with a calendar, an address book, a stationary kit, a flyer maker, and a personality profile. I’m focusing on the more interesting aspect of the game: the personalized letters and the journal entries. The full list of entries can be found at rereadingmychildhood.com.

Oh, boy, this has this been a weird week for our second favorite eleven-year-old babysitter. It started with a letter from Mallory Pike.

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I didn’t realize when I entered Parable of the Sower as my favorite book, it would be read by an eleven-year-old who uses horse stationary. Sorry, Mal. But maybe it was fine, because she’s going to recommend it to Jessi . . . who is also eleven. This is the problem with a grown ass woman playing a game from the ’90s intended for her ten-year-old self.

Dawn writes in the journal to remind us of the current babysitting dilemma the BSC is dealing with.

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And Mallory thinks she has the perfect solution.

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Really, Mallory? Forcing children to watch something called “Tubb the Tuba” may have manifested a new set of problems? Look at my shocked face. And then she tries to play it off on me. “Don’t you think so?” Excuse me, don’t drag me into your problems.*

 

*I understand this is just a prompt to get kids writing, but we’re all pretending that these events are actually happening in this world and that Stoneybrook actually exists. Play into the fiction and stop taking things too seriously, would you? Until next time!

Rereading My Childhood – A Year with the BSC #2: Stay Out of It, Dawn

A Year With the BSC is an informal series wherein I explore the 1990’s CD-ROM video game The Baby-sitters Club Friendship Kit. The game is more of a personal organizer; it features with a calendar, an address book, a stationary kit, a flyer maker, and a personality profile. I’m focusing on the more interesting aspect of the game: the personalized letters and the journal entries. The full list of entries can be found at rereadingmychildhood.com.

One of the things that the game asked me was the name of my favorite candy. If I had known they were going to ridicule me via letter, then I wouldn’t have told them.

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Hey, hey, Dawn? No one wants to eat that. Why would I want to eat something like that? Does that sound good to anyone on the planet?

Also, Claudia babysat for a pair of children, and for a second, I thought they couldn’t spell their own children’s names.

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For the record, those names are pronounced “Shawn” and “Corey.” Unless Claudia spelled their names correctly and their parents are the ones who can’t spell.